Avignon. Antigone. The Symphonies of Pain part 3.

Reviewed by Yana Meerzon

ANTIGONE – FESTIVAL D AVIGNON – 71e EDITION –
Texte : SOPHOCLE –
Traduction : Shigetake YAGINUMA –
Mise en scène : Satoshi MIYAGI –
Musique : Hiroko TANAKAWA –
Scénographie : Junpei KIZ –
Lumière : Koji OSAKO –
Costumes : Kayo TAKAHASHI –
Coiffure et maquillage : Kyoko KAJITA –
A
Lieu : Cour d’Honneur du Palais des Papes –
Ville : Avignon –
Le 04 07 2017 –
Photo : Christophe RAYNAUD DE LAGE

Antigone  by Sophocles, directed by Satoshi Miyagi;  music by Hiroko Tanakawa; scenography by Junpei Kiz

Sophocles’ Antigone directed by  Satoshi Miyagi and presented at the heart of the Avignon festival, in the Palais des papes, is one more example of a theatre  as a  symphony  of pain.

Antigone – much like the other productions –  is also a play about war, injustice and suffering. It concerns the death of a young woman whose personal goal was to bury her brother and put his soul to rest.  One of the foundational myths of Western consciousness, in Satoshi Miyagi’s theatrical universe,  this Greek tragedy also links  the traditions of Japanese Noh theatre and the philosophy of Buddhist monks. (more…)

Avignon. Saigon. Symphonies of Pain part 4

Reviewed by Yana Meerzon

SAÏGON – 71e Festival d’Avignon –
Texte et mise en scène : Caroline GUIELA NGUYEN –
Collaboration artistique : Claire CALVI –
Dramaturgie : Jérémie SCHEIDLER – Manon WORMS –
Traduction : Duc Duy Nguyen, Thi Thanh Thu Tô
Scénographie : Alice DUCHANGE
Lumière : Jérémie PAPIN
Son : Antoine RICHARD
Costumes : Benjamin MOREAU
 Gymnase du Lycée Aubanel –
Photo: Christophe  Raynaud  De Lage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caroline Guiela Nguyen has created a four-hour  theatrical tale based on the history of Vietnam.  Its story centres on  colonialism and the struggle for independence, reflected in the lives of several Vietnamese families, who left Saigon for France. Nguyen is an offspring of this exodus. For her,  the post-colonial history of Vietnam, and the history of Hồ Chí Minh–city, the city of Saigon,    the one that “we can tell only with tears in our eyes”, is  part of her identity and her artistic exploration.  The play captures  the drama of departures and returns, the tragedy of unfulfilled hopes and the suffering of misunderstanding. (more…)

Avignon: Standing in Time Symphonies of Pain part 2

Reviewed by Yana Meerzon

Standing in Time, Photo: Christophe Raynaud de Lage

Standing in Time.  texts by Rasha Abbas.  Direction, scenography by Lemi Ponifasio; sound design by Lemi Ponifasio (Auckland)

Lemi Ponifasio’s Standing in Time, also the example of a  symphony of pain,  speaks as well of abused women, the victims of history and colonial genocide. Ponifasio’s context is very different from  that of Munyaneza’s because she meditates on the  history of colonial oppression in New Zealand. The style of the production is highly informed by the performative culture of everyday rituals, religious ceremonies, celebrations and mourning as practiced by the mauri women from the New Zealand islands.  (more…)

Avignon: Unwanted. Symphonies of Pain part 1

Reviewed by Yana Meerzon

UNWANTED –
Conception et chorégraphie : Dorothée MUNYANEZA –
Artiste plasticien : Bruce CLARKE –
Musique :
Holland ANDREWS –
Alain MAHÉ –
Dorothée MUNYANEZA –
Scénographie : Vincent GADRAS –
Lumière : Christian DUBET –
Costumes : Stéphanie COUDERT –
lieu: Villeneuve-lès-Avignon –
Photo: Christophe Raynaud De Lage

Stratford’s The Changeling: More Fizzle Than Sizzle

Reviewed by Jamie Portman

Photo: Cylla von Tiedemann.

STRATFORD, Ont. — The Stratford Festival’s new production of The Changeling starts revealing its fault lines almost immediately.

On the one hand, we have the always dependable Mike Nadajewski, revelling in the small but important role of that sardonic whistle-blower, Jasperino, and delivering the play’s 17th Century dialogue with naturalistic ease. (more…)

Same Time Next Year: A delightful opener for this year’s festival

Reviewed by Iris Winston

Poster: Classic Theatre Festival, Perth

Same Time Next Year
By Bernard Slade
Classic Theatre Festival
Directed by Laurel Smith

Adultery has never been more respectable than it is in Same Time Next Year by Bernard Slade.

Written in 1975, the award-winning romantic comedy is as amusing and gently charming in 2017 as it was 42 years ago. Then, it was topical, as well as funny. Today, it is a period piece about social change, as well as being an appealing look at a relationship that begins as a one-night stand and evolves into an enduring connection. (more…)

Perth Festival delivers a solid revival of Same Time Next Year

Reviewed by Jamie Portman

Photo: Classic Theatre Festival, Perth

Bernard Slade’s endearing comedy-drama, Same Time Next Year, is now 42 years old — and yes it is a period piece. Yet, nothing seems dated about it, especially when it gets the kind of superior revival that has just opened at the Classic Theatre Festival in Perth.

It can’t be moved to the present. We must accept it on as own terms, as belonging to a particular passage of time — a quarter century of change and turbulence both in North American society and the wider world. It is a period inextricably linked to the lives of New Jersey accountant George and Oakland housewife Doris, both married with children,  who meet in a Northern California Inn in 1951, have a one-night fling that is totally out of character for both of them, but are nevertheless attracted sufficiently to each other that they agree to meet in the same place once a year. (more…)

4 heures du matin: une complicité émouvante entre acteur et metteur en scène

Reviewed by Alvina Ruprecht

Cette adaptation par Hassane Kouyaté,  du roman d’Ernest J. Gaines  (nommé aux Prix Pulitzer et Prix Nobel de littérature), est une  production de Tropiques Atrium ( Fort de France) oὺ Kouyaté dirige la scène nationale. Cette saison, deux créations de l’ Atrium  ont été intégrées à la programmation du Tarmac :  Le But de Roberto Carlos  (mise en scène et scénographie de Kouyaté ), une coproduction du Tarmac et de la Scène nationale de Martinique,  est une réflexion sur la migration recréée par un acteur, un chanteur et un musicien. Ensuite, Paris a reçu  Quatre heures du matin, adapté du roman de l’Américain Ernest Gaines et mis en scène par Kouyate.  Ce monologue est  une coproduction de la Scène nationale  et de la Cie  2 temps 3 mouvements.  Ruddy Syllaire, acteur d’origine haïtienne établi  depuis de nombreuses années en Martinique et qui a  interprété Othello à Montréal sous la direction de Denis Marleau, a eu le rôle du  jeune migrant, alors qu’un   acteur d’origine congolaise Abdon Fortuné Koumbha  a incarné  Lewis, le jeune noir  qui se débat contre le racisme américain dans le texte de Gaines.

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Louis Riel: An Impressive Revival

Reviewed by Jane Baldwin

Photo: Sophie l’anson

Louis Riel, Canada’s leading opera composed by Harry Somers with the libretto written by Mavor Moore and Jacques Languirand, first produced in 1967 to commemorate the centennial has been revived for the country’s 150th anniversary of confederation. The 2017 production is a collaboration between the Canadian Opera Company in Toronto and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. (more…)

Director Martha Henry delivers a thoughtful, compelling Twelfth Night at Stratford

Reviewed by Jamie Portman

Photo: Cylla von Tiedemann

STRATFORD, Ont. —  A pair of metallic trees dominate the Festival Theatre stage at the beginning of Twelfth Night. They suggest a world going sterile — a mood not really softened when Brent Carver’s muted Feste sings  to the rueful strains of composer Rena Jacobs’s music. And is there any emotion beyond languor when E.B. Smith’s Duke Orsino speaks those famous lines — “if music be the food of love play on?” (more…)

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