Summer Theatre 2012

Chaim Potok’s novel becomes a discussion of fascinating ideas with a cast not quite up to the task.

Reviewed by Alvina Ruprecht

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The novel by Chaim Potok deals with a question of Jewish philosophy and would seem to be a subject better suited to prose than to the theatre. Aaron Posner’s adaptation, heavy with explanations and literary language, tries to clarify the conflict within the young Asher Lev . There is the religious tradition in which he was raised: Hasidic Judaism, an ultra-orthodox form of Judaism which is also linked to the mystical tradition of the Kabbalah and fundamental belief in the laws as set out in the Torah. He however, wants to live in the world of the imagination: he wants to be an artist.

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Don’t stop at Norm’s Station time. Jasper Station at the OLT.

Reviewed by Iris Winston

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Playwright Norm Foster. Photo by Alan Dean. Perhaps playwright Norm Foster was waiting for a train when the idea of a script about five people in the waiting room of a train station occurred to him. Perhaps Canada’s most prolific playwright devoted more time to turning Jasper Station into a musical in cooperation with composer and lyricist Steve Thomas than is obvious from the very stilted first act of this play with music, first presented in 2001.

Act II has a little more substance — just a little — but, in general, the story line of Jasper Station is wafer thin, the songs are forgettable and the characters range from one-dimensional to foolish. And weak material, however well presented, remains weak.

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Puppets Festival in Almonte: an event gaining international attention!

Reviewed by Iris Winston

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Photo: Paddy Vargas. One of the most satisfying aspects of the annual Puppets Up International Puppet Festival in Almonte is its carnival atmosphere. For two days, the main street is full of puppets, face painters, clowns, street musicians, craft tents, cotton candy and visiting families. Their view may be of a lanky stilt walker dancing to a rock ‘n roll ditty from one of the street entertainers, a pint-sized smiling version of Spiderman with his face immaculately covered in scarlet and black make-up, puppets chatting from one of the balconies or the midday parade of the entire puppet contingent. Store windows decorated with painted stage drapes and filled with puppets get into the act too and many of the townsfolk are involved as volunteers.

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Mary, Mary is well past its best-before date even though it fits the Classic Festival mandate!

Reviewed by Iris Winston

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The Classic Theatre Festival’s declared mandate is “presenting the classic hits of Broadway and the London stage” and there is no doubt that Mary, Mary falls within the defined requirement.

This romantic comedy was one of playwright Jean Kerr’s two biggest hits. (The other was Please Don’t Eat the Daisies.) Chalking up a four-year run in the early 1960s, Mary, Mary, was one of the longest running Broadway plays of the decade.

The issue is that, while it may have seemed fresh and innovative half a century ago, the script, with a stilted first act weighted down with exposition, now gives the impression of being well past its best-before date.

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Oleanna: Red collective reinforces the ambiguity of Mamet’s play in this good production at the Saw Gallery

Reviewed by Alvina Ruprecht

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Jason Lehner in Oleanna.  When Oleanna appeared in 1992, audiences were perplexed. Whether it was the David Mamet’s powerful   film scenario, or the stage production which we also saw at the NAC around that period, audiences could not quite figure out what Mamet’s position was.  Was this an angry backlash against a dogmatic feminist movement which is portrayed as a form of Fascist inquisition through the actions of a vindictive student trying to get back at her prof?  Or is this professor getting what he deserves?

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The Game of Love and Chance. Massingham meets Marivaux!!

Reviewed by Alvina Ruprecht

game6976047 First of all let’s be clear. As it stands, this production by Odyssey Theatre has very little to do with Marivaux . The characters have the same names but they are essentially types inspired by the commedia dell’arte that one could find in much theatre of the 17th and 18th Centuries. The plot dealing with servants and masters who switch identities is also a theatrical convention that can be found in Moliere, in Marivaux, In Goldoni, in Beaumarchais .

It is true that at each period, the social significance of the switching changes and that is something this adaptation has confused rather badly ..but no matter. Marivaux ‘s theatre is essentially characterized by a certain style of performance (which has nothing to do with this show) and a style of language called Marivaudage (which has even less to do with this show)

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Little Shop of Horrors. Good production of a musical classic

Reviewed by Connie Meng

Little Shop Kaufmann Photography . The 1000 Islands Playhouse has a winner with their lively production of LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. Although I’ve seen the show a number of times, it was quite a while ago and I’d forgotten how clever and funny it is, especially Howard Ashman’s lyrics. Alan Menken’s tuneful soft-rock score fits beautifully with Mr. Ashman’s book and lyrics about a man-eating plant.

Robin Fisher’s adaptation of Jack Boschman’s original set has dilapidated brick walls of scrim that either become transparent or slide back to reveal Mushnik’s Skid Row florist shop. To the right and left are alleys with more brick building fronts and stoops. The changes to the shop in the Renovation number are fun, especially the floral print cash register cover.

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The Game of Love and Chance: Mix and Match or Mismatch?

Reviewed by Iris Winston

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Time travel and genre fusion seem to be two of the sports in this Game of Love and Chance.

A mix of a 16th -century form of physical theatre of Italian origin with the work of an 18th-century French playwright, best known for his focus on language, adapted/rewritten to use current language and North American slang by performers in 19th-century costumes may or may not be successful, depending on the skill of the mixer (director/adaptor).

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Othello on the St lawrence. A final act that surpassed all expectations!

Reviewed by Alvina Ruprecht

Photo:thumbs_20120708mshakespearefestival10qfs Quincy Armorer  (Othello) and Lana Sugarman (Desdemona). Set in the period of the war of 1812,  this brooding, production of the tragic events leading to the murder of Desdemona at the hands of her beloved general, manipulated most heinously by the hateful Iago brings out all the melodrama of the situation.  There is the  raging father (Brabantio) who can’t believe that his innocent daughter Desdemona (Lana Sugarman) has actually married this Moor of her own free will. A sneering, ironic Iago,  raging with jealousy and hate who narrates the story, telling how he has meticulously set the stage for the downfall of Othello (Quincy Armorer) and the death of the lovers.

The individual performances were rather good in as much as each actor dominated his role, articulated his text beautifully and made the drama so completely clear.   I especially liked Shane Carty as the viciously revengeful Iago who inspired utter loathing.

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Black Coffee: In spite of a thickening plot drowned in superfluous banter, Hercule Poirot saves the play!

Reviewed by Alvina Ruprecht

black_coffee_web Agatha Christie has created two of the most colourful crime solving individuals in her career as a writer of mystery novels, short stories, plays and film scenarios:  Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. Both have risen to worldwide fame through films, published works and the British television series featuring each of these fictional characters.

The play is interesting in as much it already contains all the ingredients that will define Christie’s brand of detective mystery  theatre. A murder is discovered, the suspects all find themselves within a closed space (an elegant drawing room, a huge country house in Britain or a similar setting) as guests of the deceased; everyone becomes a suspect as soon as the detective arrives to unravel the mystery and find the guilty party.

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Past Reviews