Capital Critics Circle Awards

Capital Critics Circle announces seventeenth annual theatre awards (2015-16 season)

News from Capital Critics Circle

       Seventeenth Annual Awards offered bya the Capital Critics circle 2015-16
 The winners are:

Best professional production: Belles Soeurs: The Musical, based on the play by Michel Tremblay, book, lyrics and direction by René Richard Cyr, music by Daniel Bélanger, English book adapted by Brian Hill, English lyrics, musical adaptation and additional music by Neil Bartram, a Copa de Oro Productions Ltd. (Montreal) and the Segal Centre for Performing Arts (Montreal) production.

Best community theatre production: Love! Valour! Compassion! by Terrence McNally, directed by Chantale Plante, with musical direction by Paul Legault and choreography by Jasmine Lee, TotoToo Theatre.

Best student production: Pool (No Water) by Mark Ravenhill, directed by Pamela Feghali, University of Ottawa, Department of Theatre

(more…)

TotoToo Delivers A First-Class Hosanna

Reviewed by Jamie Portman

Photo: Maria Vartanova

Photo: Maria Vartanova

It’s the most famous scene in Michel Tremblay’s contemporary classic, Hosanna.

It comes at the top of the second act when the title character, an anguished Montreal drag queen, unveils a chronicle of disaster in telling us what really happened when she showed up at a Hallowe’en costume ball, dressed as Elizabeth Taylor’s Cleopatra.

It’s an extraordinary moment of theatre and a high point of this new TotoToo production. But we shouldn’t really call it a “moment,” not when it consists of a monologue lasting more than thirty minutes and taxes the resources of actor Barry Daley to the utmost.

The scene proves to be an emotionally compelling tour de force, its intimacy heightened by the production’s venue — the new Live On Elgin space. There’s pain here, also slivers of corrosive humour in the glimpses Daley’s performance gives us into the human comedy as it exists in one particular underground culture.

It’s a fading culture because events over the last four decades have turned Tremblay’s play into a period piece. But Daley’s monologue, an extended journey into Hosanna’s troubled psyche, still proved a show-stopper the other night. Daley harnesses the urgency and — importantly — the joual rhythms of the still serviceable English translation by Bill Glassco and John Van Burek in laying bare some messy emotional realities and in probing the shifting nature of identity (more…)

CCC theatre awards for 2014-15.

News from Capital Critics Circle

Capital Critics Circle announces sixteenth annual theatre awards and adds Tartan award for technical excellence

OTTAWA, November 23, 2015 – The Capital Critics Circle today announced the winners of the sixteenth annual theatre awards for plays presented in English in the National Capital Region during the 2014-2015 season. The winners are:

Best professional production:

Stuff Happens by David Hare, directed by David Ferry, National Arts Centre English Theatre.

Best community theatre production:

Avenue Q, book by Jeff Whitty, music and lyrics by Robert Lopez and Jeff Mark, directed by Michael Gareau, musical direction by John McGovern, choreography by Alison Szkwarek, Toto Too Theatre.

(more…)

From the Montreal fringe. Intersecting plots and immersive storytelling in “Displaced” by Ground Cover Theatre

Reviewed by Kat Fournier

Photo: Ground Cover Theatre

Photo: Ground Cover Theatre

Three women from three seperate histories–different countries and eras entirely–intersect in Ground Cover Theater’s Displaced. Each has reached a moment where leaving their homes for the greener pastures of Canada has become essential to their survival. And though their stories are independent from one another, here, they have been woven together in a story that portrays the trials faced by lone women who arrive to Canada as refugees.

Mary (Katie Moore) flees the Irish Famine in the 1840s, Sofia (Anna Mazurik) arrives from Germany in the 1940s after her Jewish husband dies in a camp, and Dara (Emma Laishram) must leave Afghanistan to avoid persecution after refusing an arranged marriage. And though their stories are disparate, playwrights Natasha Martina and Sue Mythen use overlayed monologues and corporeal sequences to indicate a shared theme amongst the three women. Each leaves terrible tragedy behind, and struggles in a new life as a persecuted outsider. (more…)

More from the Capital Critics’ Circle Awards

News from Capital Critics Circle

IMG_20141117_195041

Photo Brie McFarlaine:   Eric Coates, artistic director of the Great Canadian Theatre Company accepting the award for Best Actor: Paul Rainville   from Alvina Ruprecht

MOnday November 17, 2014.

 

 

IMG_20141117_200834

Photo Brie McFarlaine.

Ian Farthing accepting the Audrey Ashley award at the Capital Critics’ Circle awards ceremony on Nov. 17, 2014.

CCCAwards for the 2013-14 season

News from Capital Critics Circle

  financierodyssey-theatre-performs-under-the-stars-in-strathcona-park-for-its-28th-season
Photo, Barb Gray.   Best design (Professional) by James Lavoie for The Financier. Winner of the new Cube Gallery award.

 

awardsphoto(11)

Photo Kathi Langston THE CRITICS!!!

 

OTTAWA, November 17, 2014 – The Capital Critics Circle today announced the winners of the fifteenth annual theatre awards for plays presented in English in the National Capital Region during the 2013-2014 season. The winners are:

FEATURES

Ian Farthing  wins the Audrey Ashley award for excellence in his field. His work with the Saint Lawrence Shakespeare Festival opened up a professional Shakespeare Festivalfor all the actors in the area and opened new posibilities for theatre in the area…

Tim Oberholzer  won  the CCC special award for his performance as Hedwig ……in Hedwig and the  Angry Inch

.glen10711138_10154868030315055_766300926212442095_n                                                                

Photo: Nicole Milne, Cast of Glengarry Glen Ross.

Best professional production:The Avalon Studio’s production of Glengarry Glen Ross by David Mamet, directed by Geoff Gruson.

Best community theatre production:The Orpheus Musical Theatre Society’s production of Monty Python’s Spamalot, book and lyrics by Eric Idle, music by John Du Prez and Eric Idle, directed by Bob Lackey, musical direction by Terry Duncan, choreography by Christa Cullain.

Best director (professional):Ron Jenkins for Enron by Lucy Prebble, National Arts Centre English Theatre.

(more…)

The Importance of Being Earnest: The audience is repeatedly beaten with slapstick humour.

Reviewed by Maja Stefanovska

Photo: Andree Lanthier

Photo: Andree Lanthier

Oscar Wilde’s masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest, is a biting satire of Victorian artifice. You wouldn’t think a play criticizing a society where appearance trumps substance, so close to our own image-obsessed society, would require too much tweaking. What makes this play so funny, other than Wilde’s mastery of language, is precisely that it works within the social conventions of late Victorian London. The play works best when the characters let their actions speak for themselves, without added trappings. I talk a lot about directors’ seeming lack of faith in their audience’s ability to get and be amused by a more subtle type of comedy. It often feels like there’s a fear that, unless we’re repeatedly beaten with slapstick-type humour (with side-winks, just in case we forget to laugh), we will fall asleep in our seats. Ted Dykstra’s version of The Importance of Being Earnest falls into this category, as he inserts needless physicality and self-reflexiveness in the presentation. This denies the play its gravitas by reducing it to something trivial and renders the production forgettable.

The Importance of Being Earnest is a story about two friends, Algernon (Alex McCooeye) and his friend Jack (Christopher Morris) who, having little else to do in their privileged lives, make up imaginary friends and relations in order to get away from real-life ones, who they can’t stand. The characters in this version of The Importance of Being Earnest roll their eyes, throw muffins at each other, and, most inappropriate of all, hide under the skirts of their beloveds in the presence of the latter’s (very proper) mother. They leap over settees and foot stools in a way that would have undoubtedly gotten them thrown into Bedlam in a second.  (more…)

Paul Rainville wins Audrey Ashley award (2013-14)! Ottawa U. gets Student theatre award!

News from Capital Critics Circle

Capital Critics Circle Announces Fourteenth Annual Theatre Awards

J. P. Kelley wins best production: Princess Ivona takes the Student theatre production.
kellymages
OTTAWA, December 2, 2013 – The Capital Critics Circle today announced the winners of the fourteenth annual theatre awards for plays presented in English in the National Capital Region during the 2012-2013 season. The winners are:

Best professional production:

SevenThirty Productions’ November by David Mamet, directed by John P. Kelly.

Best community theatre production:

The Ottawa Little Theatre production of Steel Magnolias by Robert Harling, directed by Tom Taylor.

Best student production:

The first winner of this new category is Princess Ivona by Witold Gombrowicz, directed by Ekaterina Shestakova, University of Ottawa, Directing program. (more…)

Capital Critics Circle Announces Nominations for 2012-13 and Adds Student Award Category

News from Capital Critics Circle

OTTAWA, October 23, 2013 – The Capital Critics Circle today announced the nominees for the fourteenth annual English-language theatre awards for plays presented in the National Capital Region during the 2012-2013 season. The Circle has expanded this year’s list to include an award for the best student production.

The nominees are:

(more…)

The Capital Critics Circle announced its Annual Theatre Awards last night in Ottawa at a glittering ceremony attended by members and friends of the theatre community

News from Capital Critics Circle

Mugindex.php  John Muggleton, winner of the Audrey Ashley Award.

Photo: David Pashko

During sparklingly classy ceremony hosted at Orpheus House by the musical theatre company,  The Capital Critics Circle today announced the winners of the thirteenth annual theatre awards for plays presented in English in the National Capital Region during the 2011-2012 season. The CCC instituted the awards in 2000 to honour the best in theatre on stages in the National Capital Region. The members of the selection committee for the 2011-2012 season English theatre awards were: Alvina Ruprecht, Patrick Langston, Jamie Portman, Rajka Stefanovska, Maja Stefanovska, Barbara Gray and Iris Winston.

The winners are:

Best professional production:

The National Arts Centre English Theatre/Belfry Theatre (Victoria, B.C.) production of And Slowly Beauty by Michel Nadeau, translated by Maureen Labonté, directed by Michael Shamata.

Best community theatre production:

The Orpheus Musical Theatre Society production of Titanic the musical, book by Peter Stone, music and lyrics by Maury Yeston, directed by Deb Miller-Smith, musical direction by Paul Legault and choreography by Val Keenleyside.

Best director (professional):

John Koensgen for The Player’s Advice to Shakespeare by Brian K. Stewart and The Extremely Short Play Festival, New Theatre of Ottawa.

(more…)

Past Reviews