Burn: A work in progress

Reviewed by Iris Winston

Categories: Professional Theatre

Photo: John Muggleton

Photo: John Muggleton

Burn

Written and directed by John Muggleton

Avalon Studio

A telephone call more than a third of the way through Burn sets what begins as a barely smoldering chat among three friends on fire.

While it is necessary to set the scene, the do-you-remember beginning goes on too long and, initially, without an apparent goal.

We are told that the daughter of their deceased friend is flying in from Vancouver to meet them. Neither the friends nor the audience knows why. It turns out that the young woman has a story to tell, with particular reference to one of the three, Robert. Her agenda also includes making Robert aware that she is a fan of his wife —a successful writer of ghost stories who disappeared five years earlier.

Burn, when pared down, has an interesting storyline, although more than one area is left unresolved and the presentation is somewhat static. The sense is that Muggleton has more work to do to confirm Burn’s dramatic viability and carry it to a completely satisfactory conclusion.

Megan Carty, as Eve, manages to make her story suitably spooky, while Tahera Mufti, as Samira, displays comfort in the role of peacemaker. As Robert, Chris Torti reacts with appropriate anxiety as Eve’s tale unfolds and Michael Thompson, as David, while often difficult to hear, is at ease in being pushed to the periphery of the group.

Burn continues at the Avalon Studio to November 13.

Director: John Muggleton

Lighting: David Magladry

Cast:

Eve…………………………………………………Megan Carty

Robert………………………………………………Chris Torti

Samira………………………………………………Tahera Mufti

David………………………………………………..Michael Thompson


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